Saturday, September 28, 2013

Gingersnap Cookies




I was flipping through Tom Douglas' Seattle Kitchen cookbook yesterday...it's a wonderful book, full of really unique recipes.  Tom is the owner of quite a few restaurants in Seattle, including Dahlia Lounge, where I had one of the best meals of my life!

A recipe for gingersnaps caught my eye, and sounded so good!  After testing out the recipe, I altered it to use ground ginger instead of fresh, and took out a step where you roll the cookies in sugar.  If you'd like to see the original recipe, you can find it hereYou won't believe how soft and delicious these cookies are - if you like a firmer gingersnap, you can just add two minutes to the baking time.

<><><><><><><>




Ingredients:

2 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
1 and a half sticks butter (3/4 cup)
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1/4 cup molasses

Note:  If you don't have or can't get molasses, you can use 1/4 cup brown sugar.

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and ginger.  Set aside.

In a mixer, cream the butter and sugar together for two minutes.

Add the egg and molasses, and beat until incorporated.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on slow until combined.

Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.  (This is a necessary step to stop the cookies from spreading too much.)

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and form into one inch balls, placing them on the cookie sheet so they are 2 to 3 inches apart.



Bake for 7 to 8 minutes, or until the cookies are a light golden brown. (The cookies will firm up a little more as they cool.)



Cool on the cookie sheet for 10 minutes, then remove to a cooking rack until fully cool.


<><><><><><><>

I love ginger snaps in the fall, because ginger and cinnamon are such warm spices.  You could add a simple glaze made with confectioners sugar, milk and vanilla, or you could frost them with vanilla frosting.

Hope you enjoyed this recipe, and if you're ever in Seattle, check out Dahlia Lounge or any of the other Tom Douglas restaurants!
- Sugar Baby

1 comment:

  1. The lone one open to domestic players, Kangwon Land, a 3.5-hour drive from Seoul, raked in $1.3 billion in casino income last year, greater than the sixteen others combined. The Craps recreation doesn't require skills to play and win, because the casino recreation decided by} luck. Unfortunately, only a few online betting websites settle for the official foreign money of South Korea. As South Korean Won doubtless won’t be an possibility 바카라사이트 when you create an account, we advocate choosing euro, as many Korean banks is not going to ship United States greenback to e-wallets similar to NETELLER. South Korea is considered one of a small variety of countries on the earth that differentiates Korean citizens and foreigners, with tourists welcome at land-based casinos in cities similar to Seoul and Kyongju. The solely South Korean casino open to locals is Kangwon Land Casino, which opened its doorways in 2016.

    ReplyDelete